Creswick District Development Association

Churches

Saint Augustine's Catholic Church,  Napier Street.

Saint Augustines Catholic Church Creswick Catholics were served first by priests who came from Ballarat when Ballarat itself was still part of Coburg parish. The first traceable reference to Mass is a newspaper note in 1855; that Father Patrick Madden celebrated Mass at Creswick Creek, on March 8, in the new store of Messrs. Carter and Walker. Father Madden was a young priest assisting Fr. Smyth. The latter was prominent in the story of Eureka – counselling moderation before the event, and afterwards succouring Peter Lalor and others of the wounded. Father Madden said Mass again on St. Patrick’s Day (’55); this time at the store of J. A. Smith in Albert Street. And on the following Sunday he and his faithful were back again at Carter and Walker’s.

 
At that time, 1855, there were 15 Catholic children at the National School at Creswick, and priests seem to have made frequent visits to the district. Efforts were made to get a resident priest. Two years later, in October ’57, newspapers report that Catholics were expressing dissatisfaction at having only one Mass in three months, and at being unable to secure a resident priest – despite their readiness to pay!
 
The same year saw the appointment of the first lay trustees for the Government grant; Bishop Goold, George Russell (who was chairman of the school committee), Jeremiah Coffey and L. Prout.

 

Saint Johns Anglican Church,  Napier Street

Opened in 1862, this blue stone church replaced a controversial wooden structure that had been destroyed by police in 1855. Originally constructed on a simple plan it was enlarged and the tower was added between 1868-72. The chancel and organ chamber were added in 1892.


 

St. John's Vicarage

St Johns Vicarage

Now in private hands The Vicarage is the oldest of the buildings dominating the hill. Since it was sold by the church and a tall fence constructed, it is unfortunately hard to see the impressive front but the rear can be seen from the street behind the church.
 

 

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